General Health Information

  • When should you keep your child home from school?

     

    As school nurses, it is our job to maintain a healthy school environment.  That can be challenging especially during the cold and flu season.  The staff cleans and disinfects classroom areas regularly and increases their efforts during times of increased communicability.

     

    We understand that it can be difficult for parents to take time off of work when their children are ill, but it is essential to keep children home during those times.

     

    Children should be kept home for the following circumstances:

      

    • Fever > 100 degrees F  - child should be fever-free without medication for at least 24 hours before returning to school

    • Vomiting - child should not vomit for a 24 hour period before returning to school

    • Diarrhea - child should not have diarrhea for a 24 hour period before returning to school

    • Lice - child may return to school following an approved lice removal treatment and inspection by the school nurse

    • Pink Eye - child may return to school following 2 doses of antibiotic eye drops

    • Strep Infection - child may return to school following 2 doses of antibiotic treatment

     

    We understand that it is important for students to be in school, but sick children need time to rest and recuperate, as well as decreasing the spread of germs and viruses to other students. If you are ever unsure whether to send your child back to school or keep them home, please contact a school nurse. 

     

    Building

    Contact

    Phone

    Email

    Jackson High

    School

    Lori Fisher, RN, BSN, MSN

    Licensed School Nurse

    330-834-4653

    laf2jc@jackson.sparcc.org

    Jackson Memorial

    Middle School

    Carrie Anne Shoop, RN, BSN, MSN 

    Licensed School Nurse

    330-834-4654  cas2jc@jackson.sparcc.org
    Amherst

    Elementary

    Jackie Callahan, RN, BSN

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (nurse)

    330-834-4652 jmi2jc@jackson.sparcc.org
    Amherst

    Elementary

    Amanda Litton, CCMA

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (medical asst.)

    330-830-8024 anl2jc@jackson.sparcc.org
    Lake Cable

    Elementary

    Jackie Callahan, RN, BSN

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (nurse)

    330-834-4652 jmi2jc@jackson.sparcc.org
    Lake Cable

    Elementary

    Kim Critchfield, CMA

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (medical asst.)

    330-834-4637 kjc2jc@jackson.sparcc.org
    Sauder

    Elementary

    Carrie Anne Shoop, RN, BSN, MSN

    Licensed School Nurse

    330-834-4654 cas2jc@jackson.sparcc.org

    Strausser

    Elementary

    Jackie Callahan, RN, BSN

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (nurse)

    330-834-4652

    jmi2jc@jackson.sparcc.org

    Strausser

    Elementary

    Shannon Yonker, RN

    PSI Solutions, Inc. (nurse)

    330-830-8056

    sny2jc@jackson.sparcc.org

     

     updated 12/2018


    Did You Know? 

    Did you know that the second week of February is Child Passenger Safety Week?  Most parents are aware of the requirements for infant safety restraints, but as children get older many parents are confused or unaware of the laws.

      

    • Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for children from 3 – 14 years old (based on 2006 data from the National Center for Health Statistics). 
    • An estimated 8,959 lives were saved by child restraints from 1975 to 2008. 
    • It is RECOMMENDED that all children under the age of 12 ride in the back seat.  Airbag deployment in the front seat during a vehicle crash may cause serious or deadly injury to children.

     

    Ohio restraint Laws: 

    • Children under 1 year of age AND under 20 pounds must ride in rear-facing car seat.  Children ages 1-3 should ride in a rear-facing car seat as long as possible based on the car seat manufacturer’s recommendations. 
    • Children 1 – 4 years of age AND <40 pounds are required to be in a car seat installed in the back seat of a vehicle. 
    • Children over 4 years of age are required to use a booster seat until they are either 8 years of age OR over 4’ 9” tall. 
    • Children ages 8 and over are considered to be sufficiently restrained with an adult seat belt, sitting in the back seat of the vehicle.

     

    The Jackson Township Police Department offers car seat checks the 1st Monday of every month at the Safety Center.  Please call 330.834.3960 for an appointment. Additional information on vehicle safety may also be found at www.nhtsa.gov. 

     

    As always, please feel free to call or email us with any questions or concerns that you may have about your child’s health, safety, and well-being.

     


    Winter Health Tips:

    It’s winter time and the snow is flying, but children can still play outside.  Just these safety tips in mind: 

    • Dress children in warm, dry layers of clothing including on the feet and hands. 
    • Remove wet clothing frequently.
    • Apply sunscreen often.  Snow reflects 85% of the suns rays, so it is possible to get sunburn in the winter.
    • Have children come into the house every hour for warm-up breaks.  This is a good time to exchange wet mittens, socks, and pants for warm, dry ones.
    • Encourage fluids.  Children need just as much fluid playing in the snow as they would on a hot summer day.
    • Protect heads and eyes with helmets and goggles.  Winter sports such as skiing, snowboarding, sledding, skating, and hockey pose a risk for head injuries; therefore, it is important for children to wear sport-specific helmets or well-fitting bicycle helmets.
    • Watch for signs of frostnip or frostbite:
      Frostnip Frostbite
    Description Affects skin exposed to the cold – cheeks, nose, ears, fingers, toes Affects skin exposed to the cold – cheeks, nose, ears, fingers, toes This is a medical emergency!
    Symptoms -    Redness of exposed area -    Numbness -    Tingling  -    White, waxy -    Numbness -    Hard to touch 
    Treatment -    Bring indoors -    Remove wet clothing immediately -    Hold the affected body part between warm hands.  DO NOT RUB. -    Immerse in warm water not hot water – hot water can burn -    Call the doctor or seek emergency treatment IMMEDIATELY -    Bring indoors -    Remove wet clothing immediately -    Hold the affected body part between warm hands.  DO NOT RUB. -    Immerse in warm water not hot water – hot water can burn

     

     

     

    Remember to send coats, hats, boots, gloves and scarves to school with your child throughout the winter months. They will go outside for recess when the temperature/wind chill is above 15° F.